In the Moment

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Art Now, Sunaina Anand, art gallery, ecological crisis, Thota Vaikuntam, delhi,  exhibition is at Art Alive Gallery, Indian Express           Sakti Burman’s two Lovers.

Vandana Kalra Every year, as winter approaches gallerist Sunaina Anand is on the lookout for “unseen” works of masters and young artists that she can bring before the audience in her annual showcase “Art Now”. “I feel that this is a very powerful show, as every work is important and there is something new from all the participating artists,” says Anand, adding that the show features the signature style of each artist, also depicting the current global influences on Indian art.

On display at Anand’s gallery, Art Alive in Panchsheel Park, are works by 35 artists, including Satish Gujral, Jogen Chowdhury, Manu Parekh, Rameshwar Broota, Paresh Maity, Jagannath Panda, Manjunath Kamath, Nayanaa Kanodia and Pooja Iranna.

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Art Now, Sunaina Anand, art gallery, ecological crisis, Thota Vaikuntam, delhi,  exhibition is at Art Alive Gallery, Indian Express          Art Now, Sunaina Anand, art gallery, ecological crisis, Thota Vaikuntam, delhi,  exhibition is at Art Alive Gallery, Indian Express           A photograph by Raghu Rai.

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If in her work The Mother and Child, artist Anjolie Ela Menon has a mother, with an infant seated on the floor below, returns to the subject after many years, in two works by Krishen Khanna, Jaggi ji and Practicing Solo, the veteran paints the oft-revisited band wallahs. Madhvi Parekh’s The River in My Village presents a landscape of a village dotted with a smiling sun, ample greens and the welcoming village folk, and Thota Vaikuntam shares another set of Telangana women in his acrylic. Arpana Caur’s Day and Night is a comment on different phases and times.

There is Raza in his studio in Delhi with his trademark bindus. Akbar Padamsee looks at Mumbai’s cityscape from his balcony, and Khanna is at his Gurgaon studio, surrounded by fibreglass sculptures of band wallahs, and holding a photograph of him and his wife.

There is also a comment on the current ecological crisis. Pratul Dash has a masked child standing against a starry backdrop and a decaying tree, visibly struggling to breathe. Jayasri Burman’s Dharitri, on the other hand, equates the status of the environment with crime against women.

“Dharitri is mother earth, but we are not looking after her, nurturing her. We also hear about little girls being raped. In my depiction, I have Dharitri holding a baby girl, if we don’t rescue her, then there will be no harmony or peace,” says Burman, “Women have to be strong and have the ability to fight back.” The exhibition is at Art Alive Gallery, S-221, Gamal Abdel Nasser Marg, Panchsheel Park, till November 30

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